Bearded Ladies in The Vancouver Sun

roz_with_camera_and_horses_2Check out the link to the Vancouver Sun article!

Beyond the beard: Lady looks like a dude
BY ERIKA THORKELSON, SPECIAL TO THE SUN AUGUST 12, 2015

Documentary follows Vancouver photographer Rosamond Norbury as she plays with the boundaries of gender identity.

The documentary, which premiers at the Vancouver Queer Film Festival this week, follows Norbury as she organizes a gender-bending photo shoot with some local women, attends events in drag as both a man and woman and wanders the city in search of just the right shot. Along the way McGowan turns the lens on a charming, infectiously funny woman who has documented our changing ideas about gender for more than 30 years.

Bearded Ladies: the Photography of Rosamond Norbury screens on Tuesday at 8:45 p.m. at Vancity Theatre.

http://www.vancouversun.com/entertainment/movie-guide/Beyond+beard+Lady+looks+like+dude/11285125/story.html

Trigger: Drawing the Line in 2015

nude-cleaverJuly 23,2015 is the opening of the Queer Arts Festival at The Roundhouse in Vancouver. I have five pieces in the show entitled “Murder”.

Skat, pedophilia, bestiality: that is where I draw the line. Neither am I a big fan of murder.

This series revisits a photo session about thirteen years ago. It was a three day photographic marathon of four photographers to produce Fusion – a book celebrating diverse sexuality. I stated, as my persona Rod Bush, that I was only interested in shooting men.

I was born and I live as a female, however, I like to travel through the myriad of genders. It is fascinating for me to uncover the layers that build the illusion that is used to sell gender – be it male or female. “Rod Bush” is my alter ego, a full-bearded side-burned dude who also happens to be a fag pornographer. Continue reading

Bearded Ladies!!

Jasper, the surfer dude

Jasper, the surfer dude

Here is another one of my Bearded Ladies. It’s Jasper, the surfer dude. (S)he talks abut what the transformation felt like. It’s “Bearded Ladies: The Photography of Rosamond Norbury” All will be revealed…

Selling my cards

Bleeding-HeartsI’m selling my cards now via my website. They are five dollars each and come in a cellophane package with an envelope.

Here is a shot of the bleeding hearts that I have growing in my garden. If you turn the flower upside down, pull it open to see ‘lady in the bath’.

Cowgirls with a Camera

I have an work in an upcoming show Cowgirls with a Camera in Wickenburg, Arizona, just outside Phoenix – opening March 1st. If you know anyone in the area you think would like to attend, private message me with their contact information and I’ll send them an invite. I’m releasing a photograph a day up to the OPENING! It’s at the Desert Caballeros Western Museum – come on down!!

Keremeos Rodeo

I spent some of the Victoria Day weekend at the Keremeos Rodeo. Every once and a while I like to go back to the Rodeo. I go to take pictures and see how little has changed since twenty years ago when I was following the BCRA for my book Behind the Chutes. It all seems to have remained unchanged save a couple of things: the trucks hauling the horses are bigger and now everyone carries a cell phone.

Regulations require that contestants wear Western outfits in the arena, so the classic look is maintained. Bull riders now wear protective vests and hockey helmets, so I don’t know how true the old adage is: “Cowboys become bull riders so they can get to meet nurses”.

No matter how tired or out of sorts I feel, the moment I step onto the Rodeo grounds, I feel upbeat and rarin’ to go. Nothing beats the classic good looks of a cowboy!

Driving in India

I have never experienced anything like Indian driving. It’s chaotic!

Indian drivers are incredibly calm but at the same time they drive like maniacs. On the two-lane highway from Jodhpur to the Rajasthan desert, Ravi, our driver, would switch into the opposing lane because there was too much traffic on our side. He’d stay in that lane with traffic barreling towards us until the car or truck heading right for us was a millimeter away, and then he’d calmly yank the car back into the proper lane.

The horn is used as a tool of communication: I’m behind you, let me pass, get out of the way; headlights are not necessarily used to illuminate the road at night, but are used to warn: I’m overtaking, coming into your lane, let me in. Windshield washing fluid is shunned – better to flood the glass with water from a discarded plastic pop bottle and wipe with a greasy rag.

At any time you can be sharing the road with other cars, trucks, pedestrians, camels, elephants and meandering cows,  when all of a sudden a herd of goats will attempt to cross the highway – because for generations they have crossed at that spot!

Travelling at 100 kilometers per hour, out of nowhere, a speed bump will appear on the highway: this is to slow the traffic, but all it does is cause the car to temporarily halt until resuming top speed.

The newspaper refers to “this excessive over-speeding”. There are new signs on the highway:  Lane driving is safe driving I don’t think anyone notices them.

 

Jantar Mantar, Jaipur

The Jantar Mantar, in Jaipur, is an 18th century astronomical observation site. There are five Jantar (instrument)Mantars (calculation) in India, but this one is the best. Designed for the observation of astronomical positions with the naked eye, it is an enormous Dr. Seuss landscape (5000 fingers of Dr Tilwiliker).

Despite being so huge, the markings on the stone are quite detailed and precise. We had a great time finding our astrological symbols.